Month: June 2017

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Right now, the Sun is stirring up violent eruptions capable of wiping out the technology we are so dependent on, and new research has found that these blasts are even harder to predict than scientists first thought.  The findings reveal that these coronal mass ejections hurl into Earth’s atmosphere like a sneeze rather than a
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In the continuous pursuit of a truly renewable and clean energy source, nothing compares to nuclear fusion. Although scientists have already found ways to harness the energy from the reaction that powers stars, it hasn’t been an easy feat. Despite the advances in research pertaining to nuclear fusion, there still isn’t a stable – not to
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Scientists have integrated carbon nanotubes in neurons to control growth and restore lost electrical connections between nerve cells. They have shown that the carbon nanotubes can be used safely and hope they can restore neural function to people with spinal injuries. The integration of carbon nanotubes brought along some unexpected benefits too.   Carbon nanotubes
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Palm cockatoos don’t simply warble or croon like other birds. The northern Australian birds are drummers. These Neil Pearts of the parrot world break off sticks or seedpods and, holding the object in their feet, rap against hollow tree branches.   The knock-knock-knock of twig on wood is, to female palm cockatoos, quite studly. Drumming draws biologists to the cockatoos, too.
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While the famous Antarctic “ozone hole” is finally beginning to heal, 30 years after it was first discovered, scientists have just identified a new threat to its recovery. A study, just out Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, suggests that a common industrial chemical called dichloromethane – which has the power to destroy ozone –
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If humans have any hope of living forever, we should probably take a hint from the dozens of other animals on Earth that far outpace our measly 71 years. One of the longest-lived of these animals is the Greenland shark, which researchers only recently discovered could survive for so long.   On a 2017 expedition,
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Scientists have developed special algorithms that enable body scaffolds called exoskeletons to adjust to the walk of the person wearing them, making these robotic aids more efficient and personalised. The enhanced mechanics are able to tweak their behaviour based on feedback from the wearer’s metabolism and other measurements, and the team behind the system is